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Program

SustainMV - The Sustainability Summer School

We have packed the week full of inspiring talks, exciting workshops, interactive sessions with current students, university representatives and student sustainability initiatives, and more. Click on a session for more details.

Welcome & Opening

This very first joint sustainability summer school will be opened by its patron Mrs Bettina Martin, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern’s Minister of Education, Science and Culture, and the Rectors of the universities hosting SustainMV: Neubrandenburg, Greifswald, Stralsund,  Rostock, and Wismar.

 

Mrs Bettina Martin, Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern

Prof. Dr. Gerd Teschke, Hochschule Neubrandenburg

Prof. Dr. Katharina Riedel, Universität Greifswald

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Petra Maier, Hochschule Stralsund

Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Schareck, Universität Rostock

Prof. Dr. Bodo Wiegand-Hoffmeister, Hochschule Wismar

Welcome to the day

A brief introduction to the day’s program and organization.

Keynote: Sustainability – from a fuzzy concept to a guiding principle

A recent online article is aptly titled: “Sustainability – confusing term for a clever concept“. This nicely summaries both the beauty and challenge in dealing with this important concept. The idea of  sustainability first emerged with regards to forestry,  where  it  means  never  harvesting more  than  what  the  forest  yields  in  new  growth. The  word “Nachhaltigkeit”  (the  German  term  for sustainability)  was  first  used  with  this  meaning  in  1713. Since then the concept of sustainability has come a long way.  In general terms, sustainability means meeting our own needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. However, this is not restricted to the natural environment but also extends to social and economic resources. Thus, sustainability goes beyond environmentalism and also encompasses social equity and economic development. Sustainability can also be understood as a movement which has its roots in social justice, conservationism or internationalism. By the end of the 20th century, many of these ideas were united under the roof of “sustainable development” and found their most prominent expression in the Sustainable Development Goals (SGD) as the current global agenda for reducing poverty and raising the quality of life. Sustainability as a political and strategic concept has its origin in the Brundtland Report “Our Common Future” of 1987. The report was concerned with the tension between the aspirations of mankind towards a better life on the one hand and the limitations imposed by nature on the other hand.

The presentation traces the history of the concept of sustainability and critically discusses its many dimensions.

Prof. Dr. Jörn Dosch

Chair for International Politics and Development Cooperation, Universität Rostock

About the speaker:

Jörn Dosch is Professor/Chair of International Politics and Development Cooperation and Vice-Dean of the Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences, University of Rostock, Germany. He is also Adjunct Professor at the University of Malaya in Kuala Lumpur, one of the leasing universities in Asia. Previous positions include Professor of International Relations at the Australian Monash University (Malaysia Campus), Head of the Department of East Asian Studies, University of Leeds, and Fulbright scholar at Stanford University. He received his PhD from the Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz. His research and teaching focuses on politics, international relations and questions of development in Europe, Asia and Latin America. He has spent extended periods of time in Asia since the early 1990s. Prof. Dosch also regularly works as a consultant for the European Union’s development program and has evaluated several donor-funded projects in Asia and Latin America.

Program
Uni showcase

The universities hosting SustainMV give short presentations to introduce themselves and the different study options they offer for sustainability-related and international programs.

Uni showcase Q&A

Question and answer session following on from the university showcase. Here you have the chance to connect to representatives from the hosting universities and find out more about their institutions.

Close

A brief closing statement to the day’s program and pointers to extracurricular activities available.

Student Lounge

Student lounges are a space for open exchange, networking and chatting. Meet and interact with students from our MV universities and review the day, the sessions, and discussions with other sustainability enthusiasts.

Student Lounge

Student lounges are a space for open exchange, networking and chatting. Meet and interact with students from our MV universities and review the day, the sessions, and discussions with other sustainability enthusiasts.

Welcome to the day

A brief introduction to the day’s program and organization.

Program
Economics of Battery Use in Agriculture: Economic Viability of Renewable Energy Complemented with Batteries in Agriculture

The production of renewable energy fluctuates in terms of sun and wind and must be supplemented by storage in the system. On an individual basis, i.e., for centralized electricity production and predominantly self-consumption, the use of batteries is considered here. Possible future development scenarios were simulated based on current price relationships (status quo). In the status quo, a selling price for PV electricity of 13 Euro cents (ct)ct/kWh was assumed with a production cost of 11 ct/kWh. The selling price of wind power is 5 ct/kWh with a production cost of 3 ct/kWh. The cost of storing electricity in a battery increases the price by 33 ct/kWh. A price of 20 ct/kWh is assumed for electricity purchases by companies. In the status quo, the use of batteries is not economical given the assumed price relationships. Changing the framework conditions, such as those of the legislature in Germany with the nuclear power phase-out and in the EU with the coal exit and decarbonization, will lead to increased availability of (fluctuating) renewable electricity, especially during the day. The purchase of electricity at other times, when the supply is scarce, can lead to increased electricity prices, especially at night. Together with falling costs for storage, the use of batteries for centralized power generators could be very interesting in the future. The method used in this study is nonlinear optimization of the target function costs of electricity supply in the developed simulation model. The results can also be transferred to other countries, as the assumed trends apply worldwide.

Prof. Dr. Clemens Fuchs

Department of Agriculture and Food Science, Hochschule Neubrandenburg

About the speaker:

Clemens Fuchs, born 16. August 1959 in Ellwangen/Jagst (Germany) and grown up on a farm, studied Agricultural Sciences at the University of Stuttgart-Hohenheim and graduated with Diploma (1983) and PhD (1988). He started as a teacher at the Academy for Agriculture in Nürtingen (1987-1989), was a visiting scholar at Michigan State University (1989-1990) and then became a research assistant at the University of Stuttgart-Hohenheim (1990-1995). In 1995 to 1996 he was leader of the project “Restructuring of Large Agricultural Farms in the Region of Vladimir, Russia” and since 1996 professor for Farm Management at the University of Applied Sciences in Neubrandenburg. Other activities: Delegated National Expert at the European Commission (2001-2002) and Agricultural Appraiser since 2008. He supports student exchange and research cooperation with universities in Argentina, Kazakhstan, Russian Federation and Ukraine. He is engaged in the development of a binational master program with double degree in sustainable agricultural production management with Argentina fostered by DAAD. Dr. Fuchs has long experience in projects concerning Farm Management and, in the field of renewable energy and, especially teaching Entrepreneurship. A selection of research topics of last years is (short title), “Resource efficiency in beef production in Germany, Brazil and Argentina” (aided by Rehwinkel foundation), “Regional effects of smart microgrids in bioenergies” (aided by German Federal Ministry of Research/BMBF) and Animal welfare and eco-nomic efficiency in the future-oriented dairy farming – evaluation of various actions and their economic impact (funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research). Most recently he was a member of the EU project TEEN FARM – TEaching ENtrepreneurship for new FARMers (Project n.2018-1-IT01-KA202-006804).

Enzymatic degradation and recycling of plastics

This lecture will show recent examples for the enzymatic degradation of waste plastic materials, such as PET, aiming at a circular bioeconomy.

Prof. Dr. Uwe Bornscheuer

Institute of Biochemistry, Universität Greifswald

About the speaker:

Prof. Bornscheuer conducts research at the Institute of Biochemistry at the University of Greifswald and heads the working group for biotechnology and enzyme catalysis. The focus of his research is the development of tailor-made enzymes that can be used as biocatalysts. This includes the production of chemical compounds, applications in the food sector, the breakdown of complex carbohydrates from marine algae and currently the enzymatic breakdown and recycling of plastics.

Hybrid Energy Storage System as Active Power Filter

The presentation is about the use of a hybrid energy storage system (HESS) as an active power filter for advantageously stabilize the volatile power output of a wind turbine. For this purpose, a HESS (25 kW / 25 kWh) consisting of lithium-ion batteries (200 x 3.2 V / 40 Ah) and double-layer capacitors (12 x 48 V / 156 F modules) was set up in the laboratory at Stralsund University. A fluctuating power conversion is simulated by a 20 kW engine test bench with an asynchronous generator. The HESS uses the advantageous properties of both energy storage technologies. These enable the power flow at the grid connection point to be stabilized, from highly dynamic load peaks to longer-term power changes in the hourly range. A major advantage of this storage combination is the reduced cycle load of the lithium ion batteries due to the corresponding use of the double-layer capacitors. A design of the HESS components optimized for the respective work cycle, together with optimized operation, ensures an increased service life of the LIB.

Ramy Soliman

Institute of Renewable Energy Systems, Hochschule Stralsund

About the speaker:

Ramy Soliman was born in 1990. He obtained his Master of Science degree in electrical engineering from the University of Rostock in 2017. Since then he has been working as a scientific assistant and PhD student at the Stralsund University of Applied Sciences in the excellence research program „Netz-Stabil“. His research areas include hybrid energy storage systems in the context of the energy transition, as well as power electronics, electrical drives and their control.

Sustainability in the Baltic Sea Region – How the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy can contribute to a cleaner Baltic Sea.

The Baltic Sea is one of the most polluted seas in the world. At the same time, the region has the ambition to become one of the first truly sustainable regions on earth. In the lecture, we look at what role agricultural policy can play in the sustainability transformation. We will take a special look at the peatlands, which as intact ecosystems can function as „kidneys of the Baltic Sea“.

Dr. Stefan Ewert

Institute of Geography and Geology, Universität Greifswald

About the speaker:

Stefan Ewert is a political scientist and landscape ecologist. He is a member of the cluster „Sustainability“ at the Interdisciplinary Centre for Baltic Sea Region Research (IFZO) at the University of Greifswald and a member of the Greifswald Mire Centre (GMC).

Sustainable Mobility

What are the options towards a sustainable mobility solution? Hydrogen cars will be compared and options for maritime applications are described.

Prof. Dr. Johannes Gulden

Institute of Renewable Energy Systems, Hochschule Stralsund

About the speaker:

Since 2012 I am part of the Institute for Renewable Energy Systems at the University of Applied Sciences in Stralsund. I lead and manage several projects regarding hydrogen technologies and emission free mobility. Since 2018 I am a full time Professor with the main focus on renewable energies. I am now the head of the Institute and continue to be involved in many research projects.

Turning the Power of the Sun into Hydrogen Molecules

Being a source of unlimited power, the sun is ideal for producing electricity. However, the energy system of tomorrow does not only require electrons but also molecules, most importantly hydrogen. Is it possible to turn solar energy directly into H2 molecules? The talk will start with some foundations of photovoltaics (PV), before introducing combined PV/electrolyzer systems. Finally, the lecture will take the audience to so-called photoelectrochemical cells, which directly turn photons into H2 molecules without the need of a separate electrolyzer.

Prof. Dr. Jan-Christian Kuhr

Faculty for Mechanical Engineering, Hochschule Stralsund

About the speaker:

Jan-Christian Kuhr is professor at Stralsund University of Applied Sciences. After having received his PhD in physics from Rostock University he has spent his professional career in the computer industry as well as the glass coating business. He has joined the School of Mechanical Engineering at Stralsund University in 2016 where his teaching covers physics, measurement technology and control systems. He is also giving lectures on renewable energy for master degree students. Prof. Kuhr consideres it a great chance for young engineers and scientists to be a part of the present transformation of the energy system and to contribute to it with creative ideas and innovative solutions.

The Myth of „Sustainable Tourism“

More than 30 years ago, the “Journal of Sustainable Tourism” was published, the first time, along with the Rio Conference a new area seemed to start back then. This session will address questions such as: What have we achieved the last 30 years in terms of sustainable tourism? Might the concept of sustainable tourism even has spurred on a less sustainable tourism industry? This session is aiming at provoking thoughts and opening up a forum for debate. It might even identify possible ways ahead based upon the support of the participants.

Prof. Dr. Werner Gronau

School of Business Studies, Hochschule Stralsund

About the speaker:

Werner Gronau is Professor for Tourism, Travel & Transport at Stralsund University of Applied Sciences in Germany. He has extensive experience in tourism research and education, with previous posts and visiting professorships in Cyprus, Australia and Italy. He has worked in several research projects granted by various institutions, such as the European Commission, the DFG (German Research Foundation) or the German Ministry of Research and presented the results on international conferences, in various journals and books. He acts as Editor of the Journal of Tourism Sciences and serves as a reviewer for several tourism and transport journals, such as Journal of Sustainable Tourism or Journal of Transport Geography.

Wind Energy Technology & Research at the University of Rostock

In this Lecture the present status of wind energy technology is reported. Fundamentals of wind turbines, the aerodynamics, mechanical and electrical concepts, are explained. A brief overview is given on research activities of the Institute of Wind Energy Technology.

Prof. Dr. Uwe Ritschel

Institute of Wind Energy Technology, Universität Rostock

About the speaker:

Uwe Ritschel is Professor of Wind Energy Technology at the University of Rostock since 2014. He also acted as Honorary Lecturer at the Universities of Kassel and Bremerhaven from 2015 to 2020 and is currently a Honorary Lecturer at the Southern Mediterranean University in Tunisia.
Prior to that, Ritschel acted as engineering consultant within the wind industry. He was the founder and managing director of Windrad Engineering GmbH from 2002 to 2013. From 2011 to 2013 he was the Managing Director of Nordex Advance Development GmbH.
He received his doctorate in Physics (Dr. rer. nat) at the University of Oldenburg in 1989.

Close

A brief closing statement to the day’s program and pointers to extracurricular activities available.

Pub Quiz

Please join us for a pub quizz and get to know Germany, MV and the different universitiy cities.

Student Lounge

Student lounges are a space for open exchange, networking and chatting. Meet and interact with students from our MV universities and review the day, the sessions, and discussions with other sustainability enthusiasts.

Welcome to the day

A brief introduction to the day’s program and organization.

Program
Resource saving Technologies for Building Maintenance

Many aging structures have lost load-bearing capacity due to dynamic loads. The simplest solution here is often to deconstruct and rebuild the structure. With innovative technologies, many old buildings can be saved and a high consumption of resources can be avoided.

Using two technologies that we have developed together with our students, we show how old bridges can be strengthened and how skyscrapers and wind turbines can be protected from earthquake loads and strong winds.

These methods are evaluated in terms of their economic, ecological and sociological effects and are compared with demolition and rebuilding the structure.

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Kersten Latz

Department of Civil Engineering, Hochschule Wismar

About the speaker:

Kersten Latz is Professor of statics, strength of materials and steel construction at the Wismar University of Applied Sciences since 1998. He acts as Managing Partner B+J Engineering at the Society for Engineering Science and Applied Research in Civil Engineering mbH in Wismar since 2008. From 2008 on, he is also the Dean of Studies at the Faculty of Engineering at Wismar University.
Prior to his professorship, he worked with Böger + Jäckle Ingenieursgesellschaft mbH in Henstedt-Ulzburg for 5 years and was a research assistant at the Institute for Applied Mechanics at the TU Braunschweig where he also completed his studies in Civil Engineering at.

Natalie von Butler

Institute of Structural Mechanics, Bauhaus-Universität Weimar

About the speaker:

Natalie von Butler is currently a PhD student and research assistant at the Institute of Structural Mechanics at the Bauhaus University Weimar. She finished her Bachelor in Civil Engineering at Wismar University and completed her Master in Natural Hazards and Risks in Structural Engineering at the Bauhaus University Weimar in 2019.

Take an online lab tour through the world of hydrogen

How can green hydrogen be produced? How can it be stored? How much energy is in it? How far can you get with a hydrogen vehicle? What else can hydrogen be used for? And what does all this have to do with the energy transition? Have you always wanted to learn more about hydrogen technology? At the Institute for Regenerative Energy Systems at Stralsund University of Applied Sciences, research on hydrogen technology has been going on for over 20 years. Here you can visit a wind/PV hydrogen cycle with a laboratory infrastructure of various applications on a pilot plant scale, which makes the technology tangible. From electrolysis to storage and power re-conversion via fuel cell systems – we show and explain hydrogen production and use as well as the current research questions. In addition to exciting experiments, there will also be the ThaiGer-H2 racing car to see. The hydrogen racing car is being built at Stralsund University of Applied Sciences since 2008 in the prototype category and has already been European champion in the Shell Eco Marathon 3 times! Curious about an online lab tour into the world of hydrogen and a chat with hydrogen expert Prof. Johannes Gulden? You are very welcome to participate and ask all your questions!

Romy Sommer

Institute of Renewable Energy Systems, Hochschule Stralsund

About the speaker:

The Institute of Renewable Energy Systems, founded by over 30 scientists, represents the joint commitment in applied research and practice-oriented teaching in the fields of renewable energy sources and hydrogen technology at the University of Stralsund.

The purpose of the Institute’s scientific work is interdisciplinary research, teaching, training and further education as well as technology transfer in the field of modern energy systems with a focus on:

• Use of renewable and alternative energy
• Energy conversion, storage and use
• Modelling and automation of related
processes
• Economic and environmental aspects of
such energy systems

 

Prof. Dr. Johannes Gulden

Institute of Renewable Energy Systems, Hochschule Stralsund

About the speaker:

Since 2012 I am part of the Institute for Renewable Energy Systems at the University of Applied Sciences in Stralsund. I lead and manage several projects regarding hydrogen technologies and emission free mobility. Since 2018 I am a full time Professor with the main focus on renewable energies. I am now the head of the Institute and continue to be involved in many research projects.

The carbon footprint of everything: How to calculate and how to reduce it

The workshop provides an introduction into methods and practical tools to calculate the greenhouse gas emissions („carbon footprints“) of (nearly) everything e.g. products, people, organisations, countries and globally. In the workshop participants will calculate and discuss greenhouse gas footprints using online tools. Finally the relevance of greenhouse gas accounting for a successfull international climate policy will be discussed.

Dr. Tiemo Timmermann

Institute of Botany and Landscape Ecology, Universität Greifswald

About the speaker:

Tiemo Timmermann studied Biology at the Free University of Berlin. 1998 PhD (ecosystem dynamics of wetlands), 1999-2000 fellow at Utrecht University, Netherlands, since 2000 researcher, lecturer, project and study programme coordinator at the Institute for Landscape Ecology and Ecosystem Dynamics at Greifswald University. Since 2015 he holds the position of the Representative for Sustainability at Greifswald University. His tasks include, among others, sustainability reporting, strategy development for carbon neutrality, education for sustainable development and networking.

Program
Hybrid Energy Storage System as Active Power Filter

The presentation is about the use of a hybrid energy storage system (HESS) as an active power filter for advantageously stabilize the volatile power output of a wind turbine. For this purpose, a HESS (25 kW / 25 kWh) consisting of lithium-ion batteries (200 x 3.2 V / 40 Ah) and double-layer capacitors (12 x 48 V / 156 F modules) was set up in the laboratory at Stralsund University. A fluctuating power conversion is simulated by a 20 kW engine test bench with an asynchronous generator. The HESS uses the advantageous properties of both energy storage technologies. These enable the power flow at the grid connection point to be stabilized, from highly dynamic load peaks to longer-term power changes in the hourly range. A major advantage of this storage combination is the reduced cycle load of the lithium ion batteries due to the corresponding use of the double-layer capacitors. A design of the HESS components optimized for the respective work cycle, together with optimized operation, ensures an increased service life of the LIB.

Ramy Soliman

Institute of Renewable Energy Systems, Hochschule Stralsund

About the speaker:

Ramy Soliman was born in 1990. He obtained his Master of Science degree in electrical engineering from the University of Rostock in 2017. Since then he has been working as a scientific assistant and PhD student at the Stralsund University of Applied Sciences in the excellence research program „Netz-Stabil“. His research areas include hybrid energy storage systems in the context of the energy transition, as well as power electronics, electrical drives and their control.

Turning the Power of the Sun into Hydrogen Molecules

Being a source of unlimited power, the sun is ideal for producing electricity. However, the energy system of tomorrow does not only require electrons but also molecules, most importantly hydrogen. Is it possible to turn solar energy directly into H2 molecules? The talk will start with some foundations of photovoltaics (PV), before introducing combined PV/electrolyzer systems. Finally, the lecture will take the audience to so-called photoelectrochemical cells, which directly turn photons into H2 molecules without the need of a separate electrolyzer.

Prof. Dr. Jan-Christian Kuhr

Faculty for Mechanical Engineering, Hochschule Stralsund

About the speaker:

Jan-Christian Kuhr is professor at Stralsund University of Applied Sciences. After having received his PhD in physics from Rostock University he has spent his professional career in the computer industry as well as the glass coating business. He has joined the School of Mechanical Engineering at Stralsund University in 2016 where his teaching covers physics, measurement technology and control systems. He is also giving lectures on renewable energy for master degree students. Prof. Kuhr consideres it a great chance for young engineers and scientists to be a part of the present transformation of the energy system and to contribute to it with creative ideas and innovative solutions.

Waste Management & Smart Bioenergy

Waste Management – history, current status and development towards a sustainable circular economy:

One of the central global tasks for the future is to supply national economies with raw materials and energy in a way that is sustainable from an economic, environmental and social viewpoint. The circular economy can and must make an important contribution in this regard. The positive ecological effects of avoiding, recycling and disposing of waste in an environmentally sound manner have been proven by numerous scientific studies. In Germany, the environmental service branch contributes significantly to resource and climate protection. For instance, it is the most successful sector with respect to reducing CO2 emissions as required by the Kyoto Agreement, i.e. compared to 1990. It should be noted that many positive effects are not even attributed to the waste management sector, but to energy or other industries to which the waste management sector provides secondary fuels and resources. However, self-criticism demands us to note that we, in Germany, are only at the beginning of a long road, regarding not only the “Energiewende” (“energy turnaround”), but also a „raw materials turnaround“. We are still far away from a real circular economy, with secondary raw materials making up less than 15 % of industry input!

Smart Bioenergy – the tasks in the sustainable energy system and the bioeconomy of the future:

Germany’s energy supply must change to renewable energies (RE) within the next two decades and the supply of organic raw materials to industry must shift as far as possible from petro-based to bio-based materials. In order to achieve climate neutrality – which Germany aims to do by 2045 already –, consistent energy saving efforts and a complete conversion to RE are required and, in addition, negative emissions must be generated. The material and energetic coupling and cascading use of biogenic resources is a central element of a climate-neutral society, and especially carbon and nutrient cycles must be closed to this end. This ambitious goal of long-term integration of biomass into a sustainable energy and bioeconomy system can only be achieved if biomass is used efficiently, in an environmentally sound manner and with the highest possible economic benefit (smart bioenergy). Today, bioenergy already holds a special position in the energy system. In 2020, it accounted for around 20 % of gross electricity generation from renewable energies and almost 90 % of both renewable heat and renewable transport fuels.

Prof. Dr. Michael Nelles

Waste and Resource Management, Universität Rostock

About the speaker:

Michael Nelles is an environmental engineer and studied Technical Environmental Protection (Technical University of Berlin). From 1994 to 1999, he was Vice Director of the Department Waste Management of Montanuniversität Leoben in Austria. From 2000 to 2006, he was Professor of Environmental Engineering of the University of Applied Science in Göttingen (Germany). Since 2006, he is full professor of Waste and Resource Management of the Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences of the University of Rostock, Germany. Since 2012, Prof. Nelles is also the Scientific Director of the German Biomass Research Center (DBFZ) in Leipzig.
His research activities focus on fundamental and applied aspects of waste management, especially technological, environmental and economic aspects of mechanical, biological and thermal treatment systems for waste and biomass in different recycling and recovery routes.
He is a member of national and international advisory and managing boards of organisations in the field of environmental protection and renewable energies, as well as board member of different national and international conferences and journals. He is author of over 400 articles and chapters in books and journals since 1994. His international activities focus on Asia, in particular on China (Guest Professor in Beijing, Hefei, Shanghai & Shenyang; National Friendship Award 2011).

Turning the Power of the Sun into Hydrogen Molecules

Being a source of unlimited power, the sun is ideal for producing electricity. However, the energy system of tomorrow does not only require electrons but also molecules, most importantly hydrogen. Is it possible to turn solar energy directly into H2 molecules? The talk will start with some foundations of photovoltaics (PV), before introducing combined PV/electrolyzer systems. Finally, the lecture will take the audience to so-called photoelectrochemical cells, which directly turn photons into H2 molecules without the need of a separate electrolyzer.

Prof. Dr. Jan-Christian Kuhr

Faculty for Mechanical Engineering, Hochschule Stralsund

About the speaker:

Jan-Christian Kuhr is professor at Stralsund University of Applied Sciences. After having received his PhD in physics from Rostock University he has spent his professional career in the computer industry as well as the glass coating business. He has joined the School of Mechanical Engineering at Stralsund University in 2016 where his teaching covers physics, measurement technology and control systems. He is also giving lectures on renewable energy for master degree students. Prof. Kuhr consideres it a great chance for young engineers and scientists to be a part of the present transformation of the energy system and to contribute to it with creative ideas and innovative solutions.

Close

A brief closing statement to the day’s program and pointers to extracurricular activities available.

Student Lounge

Student lounges are a space for open exchange, networking and chatting. Meet and interact with students from our MV universities and review the day, the sessions, and discussions with other sustainability enthusiasts.

Student Lounge

Student lounges are a space for open exchange, networking and chatting. Meet and interact with students from our MV universities and review the day, the sessions, and discussions with other sustainability enthusiasts.

Welcome to the day

A brief introduction to the day’s program and organization.

Program
Using Light to Perform Chemistry

Chemical production chains have traditionally been designed to rely on fossil resources, which are needed both as a chemical feedstock, but also as energy source. For the chemical feedstock, various research initiatives target the use of biomass or greenhouse gases as alternatives to oil and gas. However, the use of sustainable options to provide the energy for the chemical transformations is no less important. In fact, due to the rich variety in chemical structures present in crude oil, the more and more precious residual amounts we have available should not be used to just burn them.

It is an intriguing idea to use the light of the sun directly to power chemical production processes. Some photochemical processes are already performed on an industrial scale, but they are highly specialized for niche applications and require highly energetic UV light. An alternative are photocatalytic processes, in which a light-activated material, often a semiconductor, acts as a catalyst to reduce activation barriers and improve selectivity. If less energy is needed to carry out the reaction, the much better available visible light can be used. Photocatalysis also offers the chance to broaden the scope of possible reactions. In this respect, in particular the activation of water and carbon dioxide, to produce hydrogen and other energy carriers, is a recent challenge that receives world-wide attention. Lastly, the light can also be used to induce an electrical current, either directly in a photoactive material that can catalyze the reaction, or in a solar cell that powers an electrochemical cell. Such (photo)electrochemical processes often promise higher efficiency, but the physical and chemical principles that govern the reaction progress are vastly different from “conventional” chemical production.

The talk will provide an overview over the different varieties to conduct a reaction with light, and offer the possibility to critically discuss the pros and cons.

Prof. Jennifer Strunk

Heterogeneous Photocatalysis, Leibniz-Institut für Katalyse

About the speaker:

Jennifer Strunk received her diploma and PhD degree in Industrial Chemistry from the Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany, in 2004 and 2008, respectively. After a postdoctoral stay at UC Berkeley (2008-2010) and employment as junior research group leader at Ruhr-University (2010-2014) and as research group leader at the Max-Planck-Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion (2014-2016), she became head of the new Department of Heterogeneous Photocatalysis at the Leibniz Institute for Catalysis (LIKAT) in Rostock, Germany, in January 2017. She is also appointed as Professor (W2) for Catalysis at the University of Rostock, Germany. Since January 2019 she additionally serves as Editor for Applied Surface Science (Elsevier). Her prime research interest is to develop reliable and reproducible research methodologies to understand the basic elementary processes and active sites in heterogeneous photocatalysis.

When tourists don’t walk their talk: Bridging the intention-behavior gap among sustainable tourism services

Consumers are paying increasing attention towards sustainable products and services such as ecological food, ethically produced clothes, or touristic offers. The tourism industry, can on the one hand lead to a global paradigm shift, but at the same time also causes serious negative ecological as well as ethical impacts. However, a shift toward sustainable tourism can only be achieved by consumers participation. But there is still a gap between consumers intention and actual behavior. In this session we will take a look on tourists’ behavioral barriers and investigate possible reasons and ways to overcome those barriers.

Dr. Maxi Bergel

Department of Business Administration, Universität Rostock

About the speaker:

Maxi Bergel works as a research assistant at the Chair of Marketing at the University of Rostock since 2014. In 2019, she received her PhD in the field of services marketing on the topic of relationship marketing, in particular on the topics of complaint management and customer engagement in tourism. Since 2021, she is leading the BMJV-funded project „SMart – Sustainable Service Management“ and investigates measures to overcome purchase and consumption barriers of sustainable services using tourism as an example.

Upcycling, Downcycling, Precycling – The world of Recycling

The world is sinking into the garbage of the affluent society and humanity is mercilessly exploiting the world’s resources! Especially young people have recognized, that things cannot go on like this. So, they look for ways to change the world and they become active. Upcycling, Downcycling and preferred Precycling are methods to reduce the mountains of trash. The speech shows ideas from multi- and intercultural student teams at Wismar University.

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Henrik Schnegas

Department of Mechanical Engineering / Process and Environmental Technology, Hochschule Wismar

About the speaker:

Henrik Schnegas was born in 1966 in Rostock and obtained his Dr.-Ing. in 2004 at the Universität Rostock, with a focus on the reliability of technical systems. Since 2004, he teaches in the area of construction technology at the Faculty for Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering/ Process and Environmental Technology, Hochschule Wismar. Sustainability is a special focus in teaching design methodology (2nd sem. Bachelor Mechanical Engineering), in applied design / industrial design (4th Sem. BEng.), reliability and service life of technical systems (1st Sem. Master Mechanical Engineering / Process and Energy Engineering MEng. And 1st Sem. Master’s distance learning course in Quality Management) and in creativity and innovation methods / entrepreneurship (2nd sem. MEng. And master’s course in international management). In these modules students, in small, interdisciplinary teams, develop new innovative products – that are ecological, social and sustainable – on the topics of air, solar, water, wind, electromobility or upcycling, and can describe and positively influence the service life and reliability of products. His main research topics are service life, reliability and security of technical systems and creative techniques for small and very small companies.

Upcycling, Downcycling, Precycling – The world of Recycling

The world is sinking into the garbage of the affluent society and humanity is mercilessly exploiting the world’s resources! Especially young people have recognized, that things cannot go on like this. So, they look for ways to change the world and they become active. Upcycling, Downcycling and preferred Precycling are methods to reduce the mountains of trash. The speech shows ideas from multi- and intercultural student teams at Wismar University.

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Henrik Schnegas

Department of Mechanical Engineering / Process and Environmental Technology, Hochschule Wismar

About the speaker:

Henrik Schnegas was born in 1966 in Rostock and obtained his Dr.-Ing. in 2004 at the Universität Rostock, with a focus on the reliability of technical systems. Since 2004, he teaches in the area of construction technology at the Faculty for Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering/ Process and Environmental Technology, Hochschule Wismar. Sustainability is a special focus in teaching design methodology (2nd sem. Bachelor Mechanical Engineering), in applied design / industrial design (4th Sem. BEng.), reliability and service life of technical systems (1st Sem. Master Mechanical Engineering / Process and Energy Engineering MEng. And 1st Sem. Master’s distance learning course in Quality Management) and in creativity and innovation methods / entrepreneurship (2nd sem. MEng. And master’s course in international management). In these modules students, in small, interdisciplinary teams, develop new innovative products – that are ecological, social and sustainable – on the topics of air, solar, water, wind, electromobility or upcycling, and can describe and positively influence the service life and reliability of products. His main research topics are service life, reliability and security of technical systems and creative techniques for small and very small companies.

Human-centered AI and Digital Innovations for Sustainability

How can we use the potential of artificial intelligence and digital technologies for designing innovative solutions that can support more sustainable personal, economic and societal practices? This talk will give examples of AI applications and practical digital innovations for sustainability and discuss their design principles. This includes e.g. digital assistants, apps and smart dashboards that support behavioural change for more sustainable behaviour in everyday life (e.g. water and electricity consumption), or that support companies to increase energy efficiency in their operations and to realize new, sustainability-oriented services. The presented examples will demonstrate how we can design digital innovations and AI applications in a human-centric way that takes into account the ethical, environmental and societal issues of their use from the outset. This includes illustrating how AI applications for sustainability can be developed without large amounts of data and complex models to make them more easily understandable and their operation more sustainable.

Prof. Jasminko Novak

Institute for Applied Computer Science, Hochschule Stralsund

About the speaker:

Prof. Dr. Jasminko Novak is Professor of Information Systems at Stralsund University of Applied Sciences and heads the Competence Center Human-centered Intelligent Systems & Sustainability at its IACS – Institute for Applied Computer Science. He is also chairman of the European Institute for Participatory Media in Berlin. Prof. Novak’s recent research investigates how human-centered AI applications can be developed put people and not the technology at the center and consider the possible impact on the economy, the environment and society. In interdisciplinary research projects practical digital innovations for sustainability are co-created and developed together with users and companies enabling them to realize new, sustainability-oriented business models and services.

Sphagnum moss as „a very cheap and useful bandage“ (obtainable at Apothecary Beckström in Neu-Strelitz). Compostable bandaging material around 1900.

In the 19th and 20th century, the making of dressings used to be a task performed by nurses. Material like stypes, plasters and non-adherent dressings were mostly made from organic and renewable material and with due regard to asepsis. What kind of resources did they use and how could some ideas be interesting today?

Dr. Anja Katharina Peters

Department of Health, Nursing, Management, Hochschule Neubrandenburg

About the speaker:

Dr. Anja Katharina Peters is a pediatric nurse and nursing scientist with a PhD in history of medicine. This summer term, she has held an interim professorship for Highly-Complex Care at Neubrandenburg University of Applied Sciences. She is particularly interested in contemporary nursing theories, professionalization of nursing and historical nursing research.

Sphagnum moss as „a very cheap and useful bandage“ (obtainable at Apothecary Beckström in Neu-Strelitz). Compostable bandaging material around 1900.

In the 19th and 20th century, the making of dressings used to be a task performed by nurses. Material like stypes, plasters and non-adherent dressings were mostly made from organic and renewable material and with due regard to asepsis. What kind of resources did they use and how could some ideas be interesting today?

Dr. Anja Katharina Peters

Department of Health, Nursing, Management, Hochschule Neubrandenburg

About the speaker:

Dr. Anja Katharina Peters is a pediatric nurse and nursing scientist with a PhD in history of medicine. This summer term, she has held an interim professorship for Highly-Complex Care at Neubrandenburg University of Applied Sciences. She is particularly interested in contemporary nursing theories, professionalization of nursing and historical nursing research.

Close

A brief closing statement to the day’s program and pointers to extracurricular activities available.

Student Lounge

Student lounges are a space for open exchange, networking and chatting. Meet and interact with students from our MV universities and review the day, the sessions, and discussions with other sustainability enthusiasts.

Student Lounge

Student lounges are a space for open exchange, networking and chatting. Meet and interact with students from our MV universities and review the day, the sessions, and discussions with other sustainability enthusiasts.

Welcome to the day

A brief introduction to the day’s program and organization.

Program
Roundtable: Tipping Points for Sustainable Development – A Regional Perspective in MV

Here potentials and challenges for sustainability in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern are discussed from different perspectives, with panel guests from business, science and society.

Dr. Tiemo Timmermann

Institute of Botany and Landscape Ecology, Universität Greifswald

About the speaker:

Tiemo Timmermann studied Biology at the Free University of Berlin. 1998 PhD (ecosystem dynamics of wetlands), 1999-2000 fellow at Utrecht University, Netherlands, since 2000 researcher, lecturer, project and study programme coordinator at the Institute for Landscape Ecology and Ecosystem Dynamics at Greifswald University. Since 2015 he holds the position of the Representative for Sustainability at Greifswald University. His tasks include, among others, sustainability reporting, strategy development for carbon neutrality, education for sustainable development and networking.

Dr. Franziska Tanneberger

Greifswald Mire Centre + Institute of Botany and Landscape Ecology, Universität Greifswald

About the speaker:

Franziska Tanneberger is a senior researcher at the Institute of Botany and Landscape Ecology at Greifswald University and co-director of the Greifswald Mire Centre, Germany. She has studied landscape ecology at Greifswald (DE) and Reading (UK) universities. Her research includes fen mire ecology and biodiversity, paludiculture, and peatland restoration, particularly within carbon schemes and with a focus on Germany, Russia, Belarus, and Poland. The Greifswald Mire Centre is a science-policy-practice-interface of University of Greifswald, Michael Succow Foundation and DUENE e.V. More than 50 peatland experts of various disciplines work at the GMC. The GMC coordinates several peatland databases, including the Global Peatland Database (GPD), the Database of Potential Paludiculture Plants (DPPP), and the Peatland and Nature Conservation International Library (PeNCIL). The GMC is founding member of the Global Peatlands Initiative (GPI).

Thekla Wilkening

Kleiderei, theklawilkening.de

About the speaker:

Thekla Wilkening founded her first company „Kleiderei“, a Fashion-Rental-Service when she was 25 years old. „Kleiderei“ is Germanys first Access-over-Ownership and an revolutionary example for circular economy in textiles. Today she is consulting different business models in terms of sustainability and is an active advocate for more social justice in the fashion industry. Wilkening has just published her first book “Das Bio-Pizza Dilemma”, which encourages readers to find their own approach to a sustainable (fashion)lifestyle.

Anna Hope

Projekthof Karnitz, projekthof-karnitz.de

About the speaker:

How do we form resilient networks that bring out fun-oriented and creative sustainable behaviour, create synergy effects and enrich consumers, instead of bringing out a feeling of sanity-driven individual resignation?

I studied cultural management and am co-founder of „Regionalwert“ in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, which is a citizen shares coorporation. We connect producers, processors, local communities and educational institutions with each other and support people who create products and services which bring social and infrastructural benefits into this region.

Marie Heidenreich

Bündnis 90/Die Grünen MV (Green Party MV), marie-heidenreich.de

About the speaker:

Marie Heidenreich is running for the state parliament MV for the Green Party. She works as a science journalist and writes about marine and climate research. As an activist at Radentscheid Rostock, she advocates better cycling infrastructure.

Hannes Trettin

Project Bay GmbH, project-bay-coworking.de

About the speaker:

Hannes Trettin is an industrial engineer (mechanical engineering) and founder (SNAZZ, Project Bay) as well as a lecturer at HTW Berlin for business administration/commerce and entrepreneurship. He has worked internationally as a manager for the e-mobility sector at Robert Bosch GmbH and previously for Deloitte GmbH, Continental AG and AUDI AG. In the course of these activities, he has built up an extensive network in the mechanical engineering scene. With the foundation of SNAZZ (sustainable fashion platform), he has expanded this with networks in the accelerator, co-working and start-up scene.

Program
Exhibition

Meet MV sustainability initiatives and find out what student engagement on sustainability topics in MV can look like. Representatives, some current or former students of our MV universities, introduce their initiative and tell you more about their engagement, goals, target groups and which campaigns they are currently running

Closing Concert

SustainMV 2021 closes with a concert presented by the Hochschule für Musik und Theater Rostock. Just take a seat and listen to the wonderful music.

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